theenergyissue:

Luke Evans’ “Xero" Xerographic Print Series
By deconstructing the process for making xerox prints, Luke Evans transforms a technological mechanism into an artistic device. Typical modern-day xerox machines work by charging a drum with an image, applying oppositely charged toner powder. The drum is then pressed onto paper, which is then heat sealed. Evans approximates the process in a more manual way with a high-voltage Van Der Graaf generator. After using it to charge a piece of acrylic with 400,00 volts of electricity, he sprinkles toner powder on the surface. The powder, attracted to the static discharge, disperses instantly into spidery patterns: some look like microbes; others, like creeping tendrils. He then presses the acrylic onto a sheet of paper and heat seals it with an iron, leaving a unique, charcoal-like impression. 
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theenergyissue:

Luke Evans’ “Xero" Xerographic Print Series
By deconstructing the process for making xerox prints, Luke Evans transforms a technological mechanism into an artistic device. Typical modern-day xerox machines work by charging a drum with an image, applying oppositely charged toner powder. The drum is then pressed onto paper, which is then heat sealed. Evans approximates the process in a more manual way with a high-voltage Van Der Graaf generator. After using it to charge a piece of acrylic with 400,00 volts of electricity, he sprinkles toner powder on the surface. The powder, attracted to the static discharge, disperses instantly into spidery patterns: some look like microbes; others, like creeping tendrils. He then presses the acrylic onto a sheet of paper and heat seals it with an iron, leaving a unique, charcoal-like impression. 
Zoom Info
theenergyissue:

Luke Evans’ “Xero" Xerographic Print Series
By deconstructing the process for making xerox prints, Luke Evans transforms a technological mechanism into an artistic device. Typical modern-day xerox machines work by charging a drum with an image, applying oppositely charged toner powder. The drum is then pressed onto paper, which is then heat sealed. Evans approximates the process in a more manual way with a high-voltage Van Der Graaf generator. After using it to charge a piece of acrylic with 400,00 volts of electricity, he sprinkles toner powder on the surface. The powder, attracted to the static discharge, disperses instantly into spidery patterns: some look like microbes; others, like creeping tendrils. He then presses the acrylic onto a sheet of paper and heat seals it with an iron, leaving a unique, charcoal-like impression. 
Zoom Info
theenergyissue:

Luke Evans’ “Xero" Xerographic Print Series
By deconstructing the process for making xerox prints, Luke Evans transforms a technological mechanism into an artistic device. Typical modern-day xerox machines work by charging a drum with an image, applying oppositely charged toner powder. The drum is then pressed onto paper, which is then heat sealed. Evans approximates the process in a more manual way with a high-voltage Van Der Graaf generator. After using it to charge a piece of acrylic with 400,00 volts of electricity, he sprinkles toner powder on the surface. The powder, attracted to the static discharge, disperses instantly into spidery patterns: some look like microbes; others, like creeping tendrils. He then presses the acrylic onto a sheet of paper and heat seals it with an iron, leaving a unique, charcoal-like impression. 
Zoom Info
theenergyissue:

Luke Evans’ “Xero" Xerographic Print Series
By deconstructing the process for making xerox prints, Luke Evans transforms a technological mechanism into an artistic device. Typical modern-day xerox machines work by charging a drum with an image, applying oppositely charged toner powder. The drum is then pressed onto paper, which is then heat sealed. Evans approximates the process in a more manual way with a high-voltage Van Der Graaf generator. After using it to charge a piece of acrylic with 400,00 volts of electricity, he sprinkles toner powder on the surface. The powder, attracted to the static discharge, disperses instantly into spidery patterns: some look like microbes; others, like creeping tendrils. He then presses the acrylic onto a sheet of paper and heat seals it with an iron, leaving a unique, charcoal-like impression. 
Zoom Info
theenergyissue:

Luke Evans’ “Xero" Xerographic Print Series
By deconstructing the process for making xerox prints, Luke Evans transforms a technological mechanism into an artistic device. Typical modern-day xerox machines work by charging a drum with an image, applying oppositely charged toner powder. The drum is then pressed onto paper, which is then heat sealed. Evans approximates the process in a more manual way with a high-voltage Van Der Graaf generator. After using it to charge a piece of acrylic with 400,00 volts of electricity, he sprinkles toner powder on the surface. The powder, attracted to the static discharge, disperses instantly into spidery patterns: some look like microbes; others, like creeping tendrils. He then presses the acrylic onto a sheet of paper and heat seals it with an iron, leaving a unique, charcoal-like impression. 
Zoom Info
theenergyissue:

Luke Evans’ “Xero" Xerographic Print Series
By deconstructing the process for making xerox prints, Luke Evans transforms a technological mechanism into an artistic device. Typical modern-day xerox machines work by charging a drum with an image, applying oppositely charged toner powder. The drum is then pressed onto paper, which is then heat sealed. Evans approximates the process in a more manual way with a high-voltage Van Der Graaf generator. After using it to charge a piece of acrylic with 400,00 volts of electricity, he sprinkles toner powder on the surface. The powder, attracted to the static discharge, disperses instantly into spidery patterns: some look like microbes; others, like creeping tendrils. He then presses the acrylic onto a sheet of paper and heat seals it with an iron, leaving a unique, charcoal-like impression. 
Zoom Info
theenergyissue:

Luke Evans’ “Xero" Xerographic Print Series
By deconstructing the process for making xerox prints, Luke Evans transforms a technological mechanism into an artistic device. Typical modern-day xerox machines work by charging a drum with an image, applying oppositely charged toner powder. The drum is then pressed onto paper, which is then heat sealed. Evans approximates the process in a more manual way with a high-voltage Van Der Graaf generator. After using it to charge a piece of acrylic with 400,00 volts of electricity, he sprinkles toner powder on the surface. The powder, attracted to the static discharge, disperses instantly into spidery patterns: some look like microbes; others, like creeping tendrils. He then presses the acrylic onto a sheet of paper and heat seals it with an iron, leaving a unique, charcoal-like impression. 
Zoom Info
theenergyissue:

Luke Evans’ “Xero" Xerographic Print Series
By deconstructing the process for making xerox prints, Luke Evans transforms a technological mechanism into an artistic device. Typical modern-day xerox machines work by charging a drum with an image, applying oppositely charged toner powder. The drum is then pressed onto paper, which is then heat sealed. Evans approximates the process in a more manual way with a high-voltage Van Der Graaf generator. After using it to charge a piece of acrylic with 400,00 volts of electricity, he sprinkles toner powder on the surface. The powder, attracted to the static discharge, disperses instantly into spidery patterns: some look like microbes; others, like creeping tendrils. He then presses the acrylic onto a sheet of paper and heat seals it with an iron, leaving a unique, charcoal-like impression. 
Zoom Info

theenergyissue:

Luke Evans’ “Xero" Xerographic Print Series

By deconstructing the process for making xerox prints, Luke Evans transforms a technological mechanism into an artistic device. Typical modern-day xerox machines work by charging a drum with an image, applying oppositely charged toner powder. The drum is then pressed onto paper, which is then heat sealed. Evans approximates the process in a more manual way with a high-voltage Van Der Graaf generator. After using it to charge a piece of acrylic with 400,00 volts of electricity, he sprinkles toner powder on the surface. The powder, attracted to the static discharge, disperses instantly into spidery patterns: some look like microbes; others, like creeping tendrils. He then presses the acrylic onto a sheet of paper and heat seals it with an iron, leaving a unique, charcoal-like impression.